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911 Emergency Calls



March 12, 2009 emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, for an emergency involving a "seizure-like disorder".

First March 19, 2009 emergency call from a motel employee on behalf of an abortion clinic patient staying overnight at the motel who the caller said was experiencing a miscarriage (in the case of two-day abortion procedures for larger babies, the abortionist first inserts laminaria into the mother's cervix to expand it over a period of hours to aid in the abortion procedure and removal of the baby. Out-of-town patients are usually put up in local motels overnight and return the next day to complete the process. Inspite of cases of bleeding or complications like this call reveals, patients undergoing these two-day procedures are not put in clinics or hospitals overnight where they can have supervised medical care during the process).

Second March 19, 2009 emergency call a few minutes later from the motel advising the dispatcher that the baby has fallen into the toilet ... and is dead.

February 9, 2012 emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, for an emergency involving a "complication with surgery".

March 28, 2012 emergency call from Women's Med Center, Sharonville, Ohio, for an emergency involving "continuous seizures".

August 16, 2012 emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, for an emergency transport to the Miami Valley Hospital. "She's bleeding quite bad[ly]."

December 11, 2014 mid-day emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, involving bleeding.

December 11, 2014 afternoon emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, for patient with abdominal pain.

June 11, 2015 mid-day emergency call from Women's Med Center, Kettering, Ohio, for patient suspected by staff of experiencing a recreational drug overdose.

Risks & Complications

According to the Elliot Institute, "approximately 10% of women undergoing elective abortion will suffer immediate complications, of which approximately one-fifth (2%) are considered life threatening. The nine most common major complications which can occur at the time of an abortion are:

  • infection,
  • excessive bleeding,
  • embolism,
  • ripping or perforation of the uterus,
  • anesthesia complications,
  • convulsions,
  • hemorrhage,
  • cervical injury, and
  • endotoxic shock.
“The most common ‘minor’ complications include:
  • infection,
  • bleeding,
  • fever,
  • second degree burns,
  • chronic abdominal pain,
  • vomiting,
  • gastro-intestinal disturbances, and
  • Rh sensitization.
Source: Frank, et.al., ‘Induced Abortion Operations and Their Early Sequelae’, Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners (April 1985),35(73):175-180; Grimes and Cates, ‘Abortion: Methods and Complications’, Human Reproduction, 2nd ed., 796-813; M.A. Freedman,‘Comparison of complication rates in first trimester abortions performed by physician assistants and physicians,’ Am. J. Public Health, 76(5):550- 554 (1986).”